Tag Archives: Mick Timpson

Yoga Nidra and feeling good!

Last night we talked a little about how important Yoga Nidra is, particularly at the beginning of the class.

 When we lead our Yoga Nidra (which means yoga sleep which in reality really means becoming awake) the objective of is to help our students find their internal point of stillness by carefully combining body, breath and mind into a single place and moment. This brings on a very deep and profound relaxed state, which will impact on every level of the mind/body field. As the body is the only part of us that ‘appears’ present, in the here and now, it is the focus for many deep relaxation techniques.

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Last night’s Level 1 YogaLife Project Class

When we practice our postures we become conscious of just how stiff and tense we are. Many of us unknowingly hold parts of our bodies in tension all of the time. Even when we are asleep the body maintains the tension. Holding tension is something that we don’t notice until something goes wrong and we begin feel tired, tense and anxious. Learning to relax means becoming aware of where these areas are and how we can change them.

The intention of our YLP Nidra at the beginning of the class is to help our students build a portal or threshold into the now. Moment-by-moment we lead their attention from the outside world and the day’s events to the here and now of the yoga studio, on the mat. It’s a combination of deep relaxation and stillness allied with underlying experience of potential and intention.

Scientific research[1] on Yoga Nidra reports an increased endogenous dopamine[2] release in the ventral striatum [3] a finding accompanied by a reported “decrease desire for action.” Its also known that expressions of loving-kindness, a sense of connectedness, and feelings of trust and cooperation have all shown to produce increased activity in the ventral striatum.

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This is where the striatum is located.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is why yoga nidra is a vital practice. If we skip it or don’t give it the importance it deserves then we are really not practicing yoga. We are simply just lying down.

Which is okay but its not yoga!

 

The notes:

[1] Kjaer, T. W., Bertelsen, C., Piccini, P., Brooks, D., Alving, J., and Lou, H. C. (2002). Increased dopamine tone during meditation-induced change of consciousness. Brain Res. Cogn. Brain Res. 13, 255–259.

[2] In the brain, dopamine functions as a neurotransmitter—a chemical released by neurons (nerve cells) to send signals to other nerve cells. The brain includes several distinct dopamine pathways, one of which plays a major role in reward-motivated behavior. Most types of reward increase the level of dopamine in the brain, and most addictive drugs increase dopamine neuronal activity. Other brain dopamine pathways are involved in motor control and in controlling the release of various hormones. These pathways and cell groups form a dopamine system which is neuromodulatory. Wikipedia

[3] The ventral striatum is closely associated with decision-making, risk, and reward, in addition to suppressing certain actions in the limbic system. It primarily mediates reward cognition, reinforcement, and motivational salience.[10] Dopamine is its most vital neurotransmitter; thoughts of gain (monetary, emotional, or otherwise) will increase dopamine in the ventral striatum, whereas thoughts of loss decrease dopamine. Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

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Chorlton Central Complete…

MTUD have completed works to Chorlton Central. The project involved refurbishing and remodelling the church and meeting hall including making a new entrance to the south end of the building. Works to the hall include removing the original Victorain ceiling to expose the original roof trusses.

The building new reclaims this important part of Chorlton creating a new land mark in the area while also giving this key local asset a whole new lease of life.

 

Down at the seaside…

MTUD have joined in with way finding architects, Placemarque to develop a way finding, identity and town centre investment framework for Littlehampton on the West Sussex coast. The project involves developing a strategy, which will link the town centre back into its seafront and beach and the new River Arun Promenade now under construction.

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